Rock wall and beacon station remains from the Joseon Dynasty on Jwaisan Mountain in Goseong

한국의 좌이산 봉수대까지의 하이킹

주소: 경남 고성군 하일면 송천리 산 52-4

I first noticed Jwaisan Mountain while driving around the base of it and looking up, thinking it would be an interesting one to hike.

At that time, I didn’t know Jwaisan Mountain has remains of a beacon station used during the Joseon Dynasty. It received a signal from Geoje and sent the signal to Sacheon.

The main peak can be approached from three starting points. I chose to start from around Cheonglyong Temple.

Jwaisan hiking trail map

As you approach the temple, the trail is to the right of the temple. It took me a few minutes to figure that out.

While this is the shortest of the three routes, there was not much to look at for much of the way up.

Wooden logs across a gap in the trail

At one point, the trail bends to the right, but a sign warns that it is a private area. So hikers need to take a smaller trail on the left around a metal pole.

This narrower trail leads through a pine forest and up to a ridge.

Jwaisan peak is 0.2m to the left from the top of the ridge.

A signpost on a mountain ridge with the sea in the background

A glance to the right looked inviting, and I later went this way.

A mountain ridge with tree roots and rocks sticking up with blue sea in the background

The peak is quite rocky and it sticks out to suit being used as a beacon station.

Brown grass and rocks around a mountain peak

It’s always fun scrambling up the craggy peaks.

The rocky peak of Jwaisan

The weather was not bad for December 31, 2021.

The wooden stairs are the last bit before reaching the beacon station at the top.

Wooden stairs along a rock wall on Jwaisan against mountains

It’s a nice view with all directions visible.

Old beacon station remains the top of stairs at Jwaisan in Goseong, South Korea

A little shelter sits on the remains of the beacon station.

Rock wall and beacon station remains from the Joseon Dynasty on Jwaisan Mountain in Goseong

The smoke-and-fire beacon system of communication was in use during the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910). Enemy invasions and other military events could be communicated this way.

To quote the signpost, the beacons “had five furnaces which were lit in a particular pattern to indicate the severity of the situation.”

Jwaisan beacon station remains in Goseong, South Korea

This map shows Jwaisan mountain between Sacheon and Geoje. The signal was received from Geoje and sent to Sacheon.

A map showing Jwaisan Mountain between Sacheon and Geoje

I came across another beacon station while hiking Gujeolsan Mountain on the other side of Goseong’s town center..

Many islands are visible from here.

The rocky slope of Jwaisan Mountain and islands in the sea

솔섬, in the bottom left of the below photo, is a nice place to visit and is a popular place for photography.

Solseom Island visible from Jwaisan peak in Goseong, South Korea

A look in the direction of Sacheon (northwest) shows more mountains, one of which in the distance is probably the next beacon station.

Mountains in the direction of Sacheon

The villages at the base of the near mountains are part of Hai-myeon in Goseong.

A rock wall with mountains in the distance and villages at the base

A look in the direction of Namhae (southwest) shows the 고성공룡박물관과 (blue arrow in the photo below) and 상족암군립공원, where there are dinosaur footprints in their original locations.

The Goseong Dinosaur Museum and Namhae visible from Jwaisan mountain in Goseong

I chatted a little with the man at the top who was nice and pointed out some of the landmarks.

On my way back, I decided to check out this little smaller peak because it was so close.

Smaller peaks covered in trees

The trees obstructed the view from here, but it was cool to look back at Jwaisan from here.

View of Jwaisan Peak from smaller peak

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